flooding


Be A Force Of Nature!

storm

Did you know that we’re in the middle of National Severe Weather Preparedness Week?  Perfect timing considering this storm that’s currently hitting the east coast!  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) partnered up to designate the week of March 3-9th as National Weather Preparedness week and are urging Americans to Be A Force Of Nature.

There are three steps to being a force of nature; first you need to know your risk.  Here in Massachusetts, our biggest risks are from snow and flooding.  Storms can have a major impact on families across the state; from losing power, to damage caused by the wind and flooding, there are many risks that come along with these storms we have here in Massachusetts!  Make sure you are checking the weather reports regularly as well, we all know how unpredictable the weather in New England can be.  Click here to find out how you can protect your family and be better prepared for emergencies!

The next step to being a force of nature is pledging to take action!  Sign the Pledge To Prepare and take the first step to making sure you and your family are prepared for severe weather in your area.  This pledge includes filling out your family communications plan, putting together an emergency kit, and keeping important valuables and papers in a safe place.  Another tip to keep in mind; make sure you have multiple ways to get weather alerts!  You should make sure that your phone is able to receive wireless emergency alerts and sign up for alerts from different emergency management officials.  You might also consider obtaining a battery-powered radio that you can listen to for updates if the power goes out.  You can sign up for email and SMS alerts from the National Weather Service and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration here.

Finally, be an example!  Once you know your risk, and have taken the pledge to Be a Force of Nature, be an example!  This is the final step of being a force of nature and is arguably the most important.  Share your knowledge on any and all social media sites and let your friends know what you’re doing to prepare for upcoming storms!  Social media and today’s technology make it easier than ever to share our experiences and knowledge with friends and family, so spread the word!

Know your risk, take action, and be an example for friends and family!   Another way to prepare for a storm?  Give us a call at MassDrive and get a quote for homeowner’s and auto insurance! Extreme wind and flooding can cause major problems for you, your home, and your car so make sure you have the appropriate coverages in the event of any damage!  Achieving a Weather-Ready Nation is a major goal, but it’s possible with help from all of you!

Photo By: Cara StHilaire

 

 

Deval Writes Obama for Flood Disaster Declaration

Governor Deval Patrick has written President Obama asking for a declaration of disaster in Massachusetts. This would bring federal funds to residents and businesses who have suffered losses from the recent storm and flooding. Patrick’s office has reported hundreds of homes suffering significant, uninsured damages; more than 1,000 experienced minor but still considerable losses; and many nursing homes have needed to be evacuated. Residents still question whether their homes are safe to live in after sustaining major damages.

His letter to the president cites the record breaking rainfall of 6 to 10 inches in some areas of Bristol, Essex, Norfolk, Middlesex, Plymouth and Suffolk counties. The letter specifically mentions the death of a Middleton resident while he was pumping water out of his business and hospitalization of a Dedham man injured when a sewer pipe burst while removing water from his basement.

“Floodwaters poured into thousands of homes and hundreds of businesses, forcing residents to evacuate and posing health risks associated with sewage backups and mold growth,”

Governor Deval Patrick in his letter to the President

A disaster declaration may open a verity of programs to both residents and businesses according to Peter Judge, a spokesman for the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency. Federal grants may be given to residents to make home repairs and replace heating or electrical systems. Federal funding may also help those who have been displaced due to flooding by helping pay for the temporary housing costs. Disaster programs would be made available to residents in Essex, Middlesex, Worcester, Suffolk, Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth counties. Last week Federal Emergency Management Agency and state emergency officials inspected flooded areas to appreciate damages suffered by homeowners.

Although the rain has held off thus far Massachusetts residents are in for another trying weekend. Pull out your winter jackets and gloves, according to the National Weather Service temperatures are to drop today and tomorrow with a chance of rain.

Storm Clean Up Begins

As the sun broke through for the first time in days yesterday a massive state wide clean up commenced. The three days of torrential rain brought havoc to many Massachusetts residents. Some remain homeless while countless others find themselves waist high in basement or first floor flooding water. The storm lasting this last Friday through Monday dropped more than 10 inches of rain in some parts of Eastern Massachusetts closing schools, roads, and businesses.

Major roads across the state remain closed and several rivers remain on the rise. Scott MacLeod, spokesman for Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency told reporters, “We’re still seeing a lot of communities with a lot of standing water… Most rivers are receding, but there are still a few that haven’t crested.” State officials are keeping an eye on the Ipswich, Charles, Taunton, and Mill rivers as they were expected to peak overnight and into this morning. They are keeping a particularly close watch on the Moody Street dam in Waltham where the Charles River remains high.

Governor Patrick Deval declared a state of emergency yesterday to aid in the state’s recovery. The support brought by this public announcement includes moving large pumps from out of state locations to hep in draining water from businesses and homes. It will also send the National Guard as reinforcements for the cleanup. Deval said the state must show $8.2 million in damages to receive federal aid. Home and business owners are urged to document all damages from the flood and report it to their insurance agencies. If federal aid is approved, denied claims may be partially or completely covered by the national aid.

Twenty-three schools reported delays or closings Tuesday morning as a result of flooding while 10 counties remained under a flood warning. Although the rain has come to an end, the clean up and recovery has only begun. Hopeful residents look to the shining sun as a good omen to recovery.

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